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Company News, Training Services and Author Publication Tips

By Charlesworth Author Services on March 17, 2021

What are the next steps if my academic paper is rejected?

Preparing and submitting academic papers is a big investment of time and intellectual effort. When you work hard on a paper, it is often discouraging to receive the news that it has been rejected. However, it is important to remember that more papers are rejected than the number accepted. The work you put into your paper submission is not wasted; think about this as a part of the academic publishing journey and use any feedback received for the next version of the paper. Don’t take the rejection as an indication that the research in your study is not of value. The questions and answers that follow can help you decide what next steps to take with your paper.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 12, 2021

Best tips for becoming a peer reviewer

There are several steps you can take as an academic to pave the way for a successful publishing career. Regularly reading journal articles in your field is invaluable. Co-authoring papers with colleagues is one way to experience the academic writing process without having to travel that journey alone. Seeking opportunities to write with more seasoned re-searchers, and avail of their mentoring, is a great way to hone your academic writing skills.  Another opportunity you should take advantage of is to serve as a peer reviewer for a journal and experience the review process. 

 
 
 
 
 
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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 12, 2021

What are the next steps once my article is accepted?

It is exciting to receive an email confirming that your paper has been accepted. And certainly, congratulations are in order: it is not easy to have a paper accepted for publication so you should feel proud. Unless your paper has been accepted without revision, which is rare, you still have some way to go towards achieving publication. 

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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 06, 2021

Bitesize Webinar: Peer Review: Module 3: Reviewing Peer Reviewers

Peer Review: Module 3: Reviewing Peer Reviewers

 

Find out who are Peer Reviewers, about transparency in peer review as well as the different types of Peer Review.

 

Tune in to our bitesize webinar to learn more.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 06, 2021

Bitesize Webinar: Peer Review: Module 4: Dealing with revise and resubmit

Peer Review: Module 4: Dealing with revise and resubmit

 

One of the most common outcomes of Peer Review is the "Revise and Resubmit" decision. Watch this video to learn how to deal with revise and resubmit.

 

Tune in to our webinar module to learn more.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 06, 2021

Bitesize Webinar: Peer Review: Module 5: Dealing with rejection

Learn how to deal with rejection at the pre peer review stage.

 

Tune in to our webinar module to learn more.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 05, 2021

Bitesize Webinar: Peer Review: Module 1: Introducing Peer Review

In this module we discuss what is Peer Review, and why is it particularly important especially to early career researchers.

 

Tune in to our bitesize webinar to learn more.

 

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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 05, 2021

Bitesize Webinar: Peer Review: Module 2: Types of Peer Review

In module 2 we discuss types of peer review and types of recommendations.

 

Tune in to our bitesize webinar to learn more.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 25, 2020

Rejection at the pre-peer review stage

As you know from the previous article, the quality of the manuscript is a decisive criterion for its screening in/out at the pre-peer review stage—that is, the initial editorial review. However, a manuscript may be rejected by the journal editors for a variety of reasons, including subject matter interest, and sometimes even simply pipeline management—namely, too many articles on the same topic. But, most typically, a preliminary editorial review aims at identifying whether the manuscript:

  1. sufficiently satisfies editorial guidelines of that journal;
  2. is likely to provide clear scientific contribution and implications for the domain in question; and 
  3. has some likelihood to be favourably evaluated by the journal’s peer reviewers.
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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 24, 2020

How to deal with revise and resubmit to an academic journal

As you already know, the quality of the manuscript is a decisive criterion for its screening in / out at the pre-peer review—preliminary editorial review, that is—stage. During an initial review, the journal editors generally aim at identifying whether the manuscript:

  1. sufficiently satisfies editorial guidelines of that journal;
  2. is likely to provide clear scientific contribution and implications for the domain in question; and 
  3. has some likelihood to be favourably evaluated by the journal’s peer reviewers.
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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 22, 2020

What are the Differences between Single-Blind and Double-Blind Peer Review?

  • In single-blind peer review, only the reviewers are anonymous. Reviewers know the authors’ names and backgrounds, but authors don’t know those of the reviewers.
  • In double-blind peer review, both the authors and reviewers keep their anonymity. Only the editor knows the identity of all parties involved.
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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 21, 2020

What is Peer Review and why is it important?

What is Peer Review?

Peer review is the process where an academic author’s work is subjected to the examination of other experts in the same field as part of the journal publication process.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 16, 2020

What is article withdrawal in academic publishing?

Withdrawing an academic article means asking a journal to stop considering the article for publication at any point prior to its actual publication. This means that the article will no longer proceed through the peer review process, will not be published, and becomes the authors’ “property” once again, to revise and/or resubmit elsewhere if desired.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on August 24, 2020

What is Peer Review?

Peer review acts as a quality check on academic literature, defined as ‘a formal system whereby a piece of academic work is scrutinised by people who were not involved in its creation but are considered knowledgeable about the subject.’[1] The peer review process ensures that all manuscripts submitted to journals meet certain standards, with most journals following similar steps.[2]

 
 
 
 
 
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By Charlesworth Author Services on March 26, 2020

Managing peer review as an early career researcher: Learning to communicate effectively with editors

Peer review is the cornerstone of academic publishing, the process by which research manuscripts submitted to journals are appraised. Based on the comments of ‘peer reviewers’, journal editors make decisions whether, or not, to accept articles for publication.

 

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By Charlesworth Author Services on December 06, 2019

Don’t just sit and wait for peer reviews to come back: Write to editors and get involved!

Write to an editor if you feel too much time has passed between submission and the return of reviews.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on November 07, 2019

Received a rejection letter? Don’t take it to heart as this is not always what it seems

No one likes getting rejection letters. Sadly, however, these are a fact of academic life; papers sent out to journals and grant applications are more likely to be rejected than accepted (or funded), especially if you are doing what you should be doing and aiming high with initial manuscript submissions (trying to get your work published in the best possible journals).

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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 20, 2019

Navigating peer review: How to respond to comments you disagree with in order to maximise your chances of acceptance

Our last blog of the week will reveal how to respond to comments you disagree with in order to maximise your chances of acceptance.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 19, 2019

Navigating peer review: How to respond to peer reviewer comments – Major revisions

Research articles submitted to journals are initially evaluated by an editor, or an editorial board member, in a process we call ‘editorial triage’.

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By Charlesworth Author Services on September 19, 2019

Navigating peer review: How to respond to peer reviewer comments – Minor revisions

In today's Peer Review Week 2019 daily blog we discuss responding to minor comments received from a journal.

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