By Charlesworth Author Services on 01 September, 2022

Understanding and using the Peer Review Protocol as a reviewer

A crucial tool nearly all journals use to train and guide their peer reviewers is the review or reviewer protocol, a formal document to guide the reviewer through the different steps of a manuscript review. 

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By Charlesworth Author Services on 02 September, 2022

How various Stakeholders in the Peer Review process can support Research Integrity

Although the peer review process has limitations and flaws, it remains the single-most important mechanism for evaluating scientific research. An essential component to research integrity is integrity in the peer review process. Authors, reviewers and editors all contribute to research and peer review integrity. 

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By The Charlesworth Group on 03 October, 2022

The Charlesworth Group partners with Writefull to improve submitted manuscript quality

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By on 19 October, 2022

A healthier way to do research: Avoid comparisons with others

We’re constantly taught to be confident and to stop comparing ourselves to others, and yet, we still do. It’s human nature to benchmark our own performance against what’s around us, whether it’s for personal reasons or at work. Who hasn’t been at a group meeting, heard news about a colleague who’s just published in a high-impact journal and been hit by a pang of disappointment? Our immediate thought is:

Why haven’t I published yet?

 

Here are a few suggestions to manage these thoughts and develop a more helpful mindset.

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By on 19 October, 2022

Hedging: Making claims of appropriate strength in Academic Writing

In academic writing, when you talk about the findings of your research, you should be careful and make claims of ‘appropriate strength’. This language, which softens claims, is called hedging.

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By on 19 October, 2022

How to tackle Imposter Syndrome as a researcher

Imposter syndrome may sound like a medical condition, but is more of an experience of your work and workplace, which can leave you feeling insecure and unhappy. The experience is often described as a distinct feeling of being a fraud or feeling as though your achievements are illegitimate. It is a common occurrence and affects many in academia, mainly due to the high-pressure environment academics operate in.

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By on 20 October, 2022

A Guide to the Benefits of Open Access Publishing for Authors

Do you know that as an author, you can benefit from the OA model in numerous ways? A publication is considered open access (OA) when anyone can read, download, copy, distribute, print, search for specific elements of content within it and use it in other ways within the scope of a legal agreement.

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By on 20 October, 2022

Understanding Bronze & Platinum/Diamond Open Access Publishing Models

Within the new world of OA, there are different models, including 'Green', 'Gold', ‘Bronze’, and ‘Platinum/Diamond’. Perhaps the least-known among these are the last two models, which we will discuss in this article.

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By on 15 November, 2022

What goes into writing a Policy Brief

Academics are increasingly writing outside their specific discipline and for much broader readership. This change can be attractive as it enables academics to expand their readership and to have an impact beyond the narrow confines of their expertise. 

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By on 15 November, 2022

Writing an Op-Ed article

An op-ed is an opinion-based article, though the origin of the name actually lies in its position in print media, where such articles were traditionally placed opposite the editorial. These short articles, around 400–800 words long, express an opinion on a highly topical issue with the aim of suggesting how this issue can be improved

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By on 15 November, 2022

How to write about Tables and Figures to provide Data Commentary in your article

In many disciplines, there is an obvious need to bring in data and discuss what this data means. Non-verbal data are shown in tables or figures that are placed either within the text or in an appendix. Figures include graphs, illustrations, maps, diagrams, pictures and other non-verbal information. There are many issues to consider when contemplating the best form that this information can take.

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By on 20 November, 2022

Resisting the Glorification of Suffering in research – through Healthier Ways of Working

The research landscape is currently at its most competitive: funding is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain, while post-doctoral positions are dwindling. This creates a pressure pot, where researchers feel forced to perform way past their capacity. A common result of this is burnt out, tired researchers – an image that is sometimes glorified in certain circles.

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By on 20 November, 2022

Not publishing is not always perishing

Academics are constantly faced with the overwhelming pressure to enter the commonly tread cycle of publish, get grant, publish, get grant… This publish-or-perish mentality perpetuates the idea that to continue doing research, you need to keep publishing, preferably in high-impact journals.

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By on 20 November, 2022

How to work towards an Agreeable Work–Life Balance in research and academia

Working in academia comes with a lot of freedom. Researchers are afforded opportunities to shape their research project in a way that allows them to explore avenues that truly interest them. This is often the major draw for a career in research: the ability to get ‘sucked into’ the research and just work away at it. 

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